Children Youth

test masonry

  • We’re used to thinking of grids as blocks — a.k.a. “columns” — within rows. HTML and CSS lend themselves to this layout strategy, and users have come to expect the patterns that have become standard. But standard can get boring.

    We won’t claim that Pinterest’s popularity came from its unusual yet functional “masonry” layout, but it sure stands out. Trouble is, six columns of masonry works fine on desktop, but looks awful on mobile devices.

  • We’re used to thinking of grids as blocks — a.k.a. “columns” — within rows. HTML and CSS lend themselves to this layout strategy, and users have come to expect the patterns that have become standard. But standard can get boring.

    We won’t claim that Pinterest’s popularity came from its unusual yet functional “masonry” layout, but it sure stands out. Trouble is, six columns of masonry works fine on desktop, but looks awful on mobile devices.

    We’re used to thinking of grids as blocks — a.k.a. “columns” — within rows. HTML and CSS lend themselves to this layout strategy, and users have come to expect the patterns that have become standard. But standard can get boring.

    We won’t claim that Pinterest’s popularity came from its unusual yet functional “masonry” layout, but it sure stands out. Trouble is, six columns of masonry works fine on desktop, but looks awful on mobile devices.

  • We’re used to thinking of grids as blocks — a.k.a. “columns” — within rows. HTML and CSS lend themselves to this layout strategy, and users have come to expect the patterns that have become standard. But standard can get boring.

  • We’re used to thinking of grids as blocks — a.k.a. “columns” — within rows. HTML and CSS lend themselves to this layout strategy, and users have come to expect the patterns that have become standard. But standard can get boring.

    We won’t claim that Pinterest’s popularity came from its unusual yet functional “masonry” layout, but it sure stands out. Trouble is, six columns of masonry works fine on desktop, but looks awful on mobile devices.

    We’re used to thinking of grids as blocks — a.k.a. “columns” — within rows. HTML and CSS lend themselves to this layout strategy, and users have come to expect the patterns that have become standard. But standard can get boring.

    We won’t claim that Pinterest’s popularity came from its unusual yet functional “masonry” layout, but it sure stands out. Trouble is, six columns of masonry works fine on desktop, but looks awful on mobile devices.

>